Technology, Discovery & Innovation NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
Home Computing Digital Life Discovery Space More Topics...
You are here: Home / Computing / HP Unveils Low-Power Microservers
HP Announces Low-Power, 'Processor Neutral' Gemini Microservers
HP Announces Low-Power, 'Processor Neutral' Gemini Microservers
By Barry Levine / Sci-Tech Today Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JUNE
20
2012



Hewlett-Packard unveiled on Tuesday a new generation of low-power microservers called Gemini. The new product line will use a coming Intel Atom processor called Centerton, but will feature swappable processor cartridges so that other processors may also be used.

Gemini is the first commercial release of HP's Project Moonshot, an initiative launched in November that is designed to develop extremely low-energy servers, as well as reduce server complexity and costs.

'Transform the Server Industry'

Intel and HP said they are working together to create more Gemini server cartridges, based on future processors using the Atom architecture. HP said it is also working on developing Gemini cartridges that use processors from other chip makers, such as ARM-based processors.

HP said Centerton was chosen for the initial server cartridges because of the processor's support for 64-bit processing, hardware virtualization, error correcting code memory, low power, increased performance and a variety of x86 software. These characteristics, HP said, are perfect for hyperscale computing, which uses many very low-power servers working together.

The Gemini line is designed to handle such tasks as Web site serving, offline analytics or managing a distributed memory cache. Gemini servers are expected to be available later this year.

Paul Santeler, vice president and general manager of the Hyperscale Business Unit at HP, said in a statement that customers who use hyperscale computing are expecting to "realize radical space, cost and energy savings," and that the Gemini approach can "transform the server industry by enabling customers to exceed the limits of what was previously possible in hyperscale computing."

15 Percent by 2015

The company said that the Gemini line innovates in a variety of ways. For instance, traditional servers need dedicated management, storage, power cords, cooling fans, and other individual support, while Gemini servers will feature enclosures that can support thousands of servers on each rack by sharing this infrastructure. The result is more computing power for a given space, and less complexity, energy and related costs.

HP said that a Gemini would require a 10th or less of the power needed for a Xeon system, with both running the same workload. In addition to shared infrastructure, a major factor is that the Centerton needs only about six watts of power while a Xeon requires 17 to 45, according to Intel.

We asked Glenn Keels, director of HP's Hyperscale Marketing for Industry Standard Servers, about the company's vision for the future of hyperscale computing using these kind of low-energy servers.

He replied that, currently, "it is only the hyperscale market that would get the most benefit from extreme low-energy servers," in which thousands of these microservers deliver Web services, social media or simple content delivery apps. He added that the company expects extreme low-energy servers -- including the "processor neutral" Gemini line -- to constitute as much as 15 percent of total server volume by 2015.

Last year, HP unveiled the first product of its Project Moonshot, called the Redstone Server Development Platform. It was based on a processor from Calxeda, and the company said that Redstone would undergo limited testing with selected customers.

But the Redstone platform is only Calxeda-based, and its use might be limited to testing. In fact, HP has said that its Project Moonshot Web site is running on a Gemini server.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

PJ Morse:

Posted: 2012-06-23 @ 9:54am PT
MicroServers will have an impact on the entire server computing market, not just hyperscale. People are trying to reduce their energy consumption and MicroServers are being used a variety of uses today. Case in point is the US Micro CriKit series. They are being used as individual servers like the CriKit MicroServer and used in more complex configurations like the CriKit Desktop Private Cloud. The combination of the Low-wattage CPU and SSD's make these systems very capable and they easily replace a wide range of older 1 and 2 processor machines.

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
TOP STORIES NOW
MAY BE OF INTEREST
Protect 100% of your Data The prevalence of laptops and mobile devices in the enterprise makes corporate data increasingly vulnerable to loss and breach. And yet, workforce productivity is now inextricably linked to mobility. Click here to access the white paper "Top 10 Endpoint Backup Mistakes" to learn more about how to confidently protect data across platforms and devices while also providing features designed to enhance the end user experience.
MORE IN COMPUTING
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Dairy Queen Latest Retailer To Report Hack
Dairy Queen is known for its hot fries and sweet treats, but it just made cyber history as the latest victim of a hack attack. The fast food chain said that customer data at some stores may be at risk.
 
Lessons from the JPMorgan Chase Cyberattack
JPMorgan Chase is investigating a likely cyberattack. The banking giant is cooperating with law enforcement, including the FBI, to understand what data hackers may have obtained.
 
Who Is the Hacker Group Lizard Squad?
Are they dangerous or just obnoxious? That’s what many are wondering about the hacker group Lizard Squad, which tweeted out a bomb threat that grounded a flight with a Sony exec aboard.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Intel Intros Lightning-Fast PC Processors
Call it extreme. Intel just took the covers off its first-ever eight-core desktop processor, which is aimed at hardcore power users who expect more than the status quo from their computers.
 
HP Previews ProLiant Gen9 Data Center Servers
Because traditional data center and server architectures are “constraints” on businesses, HP is releasing new servers aimed at faster, simpler and more cost-effective delivery of computing services.
 
Apple Set To Release Largest iPad Ever
Tech giant Apple seems to have adopted the mantra “go big or go home.” The company is planning to introduce its largest iPad ever: a 12.9-inch behemoth that will dwarf its largest existing models.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Samsung Maps Its Way with Nokia's 'Here' App for Galaxy Phones
Korean electronics giant Samsung has opted to license Here, Nokia’s mapping app -- formerly known as Nokia Maps -- for its Tizen-powered smart devices and Samsung Gear S wearable.
 
Google Successfully Tests Its Own Delivery Drone
While top technology companies are engaged in an "arms race" to develop drones that can quickly deliver goods to anyone anywhere, Google has revealed it successfully tested its own version.
 
Will iPhone Finally Catch Up with NFC Mobile Payment Ability?
Apple's latest version of the iPhone may have a mobile wallet to pay for purchases with a tap of the phone. The iPhone 6 reportedly is equipped with near-field communication (NFC) technology.
 

Navigation
Sci-Tech Today
Home/Top News | Computing | Digital Life | Discovery | Space | Innovation | Health | Science News
Environment
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.