Newsletters
Technology, Discovery & Innovation NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Computing Digital Life Discovery Space More Topics...
Data Security
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Sony Fined $395,000 for Poor Security in Data Breaches
Sony Fined $395,000 for Poor Security in Data Breaches

By Jennifer LeClaire
January 24, 2013 11:20AM

Bookmark and Share
The European fine against Sony was long overdue and should have been much larger, said security analyst Evan R. Keiser. "Not only did Sony fail to use firewalls to protect its networks, it was using outdated versions of the Apache Web server with no patches applied on the PlayStation Network during the time of the breach," Keiser said.
 




Sony has been slapped with a 250,000 pounds ($395,000) fine for poor security that exposed subscriber data in violation of Europe's Data Protection Act. The breaches, which date to April 2011, put the personal information of millions of customers -- including names, addresses, e-mail addresses, dates of birth, credit card details, and account passwords -- at risk.

Just weeks after hackers penetrated the Sony PlayStation Network, the hacking group LulzSec took responsibility for another attack on Sony Online Entertainment. During that attack, information from some 100 million user account profiles was exposed. Then, in October 2011, hackers attacked the PlayStation Network again. The company locked down 93,000 accounts.

Europe's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) launched an investigation. The conclusion: Sony could have prevented the attack if it had kept its security software up to date.

No Apologies

"If you are responsible for so many payment card details and login details then keeping that personal data secure has to be your priority. In this case that just didn't happen, and when the database was targeted -- albeit in a determined criminal attack -- the security measures in place were simply not good enough," said David Smith, deputy commissioner and director of data protection for the ICO.

As Smith sees it, this is a business that should have known better. "It is a company that trades on its technical expertise, and there's no doubt in my mind that they had access to both the technical knowledge and the resources to keep this information safe," Smith said.

Smith called the penalty "substantial" and made no apologies for it because the case was one of the most serious ever reported to his agency. The Sony breach directly affected a huge number of consumers, he said, and at the very least put them at risk of identity theft.

"If there's any bright side to this it's that a PR Week poll shortly after the breach found the case had left 77 percent of consumers more cautious about giving their personal details to other Web sites," Smith said. "Companies certainly need to get their act together but we all need to be careful about who we disclose our personal information to."

Fine Not Big Enough?

Richard S. Westmoreland, a team lead at Perimeter E-Security, said the fine was weak, considering how many people's information was stolen. He also was concerned it did nothing to prevent this type of negligence in the future, because it was reactive, not proactive. (continued...)

1  |  2  |  Next Page >

 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Pat Michaels:

Posted: 2013-01-26 @ 7:19am PT
That's chump change to them. Not even a slap on the wrist.





 Data Security
1.   Tor Working To Fix Security Exploit
2.   Protect Yourself from Identity Theft
3.   Hackers Breached StubHub Accounts
4.   Juniper DDoS for High-IQ Networks
5.   Google Hacker Team to Hunt Bugs


advertisement
Protect Yourself from Identity Theft
Even if your data was compromised.
Average Rating:
Tor Working To Fix Security Exploit
Bug reportedly reveals ID of users
Average Rating:
Gartner Rates IT Security Companies
IBM, HP, McAfee, Splunk ranked well.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
A late entry into a packed category of smartphones, Amazon's Fire phone offers a variety of unique features. Now, the reviewers are assessing if they're enough to make the phone stand out.
 
Review: Amazon Fire Offers New Ways To Use Phones
The Fire phone uses Android, but Amazon has modified it to the point that it's barely recognizable. That means the phone offers new ways to navigate, discover and, of course, shop.
 

Navigation
Sci-Tech Today
Home/Top News | Computing | Digital Life | Discovery | Space | Innovation | Health | Science News
Environment
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.