Dear Visitor,

Our system has found that you are using an ad-blocking browser add-on.

We just wanted to let you know that our site content is, of course, available to you absolutely free of charge.

Our ads are the only way we have to be able to bring you the latest high-quality content, which is written by professional journalists, with the help of editors, graphic designers, and our site production and I.T. staff, as well as many other talented people who work around the clock for this site.

So, we ask you to add this site to your Ad Blocker’s "white list" or to simply disable your Ad Blocker while visiting this site.

Continue on this site freely
  HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
TECHNOLOGY, DISCOVERY & INNOVATION. UPDATED 5 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Space / SpaceX Launches Spy Satellite
SpaceX Launches Top-Secret Spy Satellite for U.S. Government
SpaceX Launches Top-Secret Spy Satellite for U.S. Government
By Marcia Dunn Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
MAY
01
2017
SpaceX launched a top-secret spy satellite for the U.S. government Monday morning and then successfully landed the booster for recycling.

The unmanned Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from its NASA-leased pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It was SpaceX's first mission for the National Reconnaissance Office. No details were divulged about the newly launched NRO satellite. Instead, SpaceX focused its webcast on the successful touchdown of the first-stage booster.

The leftover booster -- its job done -- landed next door at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station several minutes after liftoff. Sonic booms rattled the area, serving as a Monday morning wake-up call. Across the country, cheers erupted at SpaceX Mission Control at company headquarters in Hawthorne, California.

SpaceX strives to return most of its boosters for reuse. The company's first recycled rocket flew last month.

This was the fourth SpaceX booster landing at Cape Canaveral; even more have landed on ocean platforms.

SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk said via Twitter that both the launch and landing were good. But the upper-level wind at liftoff was "unusually high."

"Tough call, as high altitude wind shear was at 98.6 percent of the theoretical load limit," he said in a tweet. Earlier in the morning, he noted about the wind, "Worrying, but not a showstopper."

Sunday's launch attempt was foiled at the last minute by a bad sensor.

© 2017 Associated Press under contract with NewsEdge/Acquire Media. All rights reserved.

Image credit: SpaceX/Flickr.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
MORE IN SPACE

SCI-TECH TODAY
NEWSFACTOR NETWORK SITES
NEWSFACTOR SERVICES
© Copyright 2017 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.