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Microsoft Seems To Be Dragging Its Feet In Bringing Office to iPad
Microsoft Seems To Be Dragging Its Feet In Bringing Office to iPad

By Adam Dickter
February 22, 2012 11:52AM

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The road bringing Microsoft Office to iPad is a complicated one. While the massive growth of the iOS environment doesn't help Microsoft, the company must realize, as it did with its Office version for Macs, that millions of consumers will buy iPads who aren't going to buy PC's anyway, and they should have Office, said analyst Michael Gartenberg.
 


Adding Microsoft Office to the iPad would boost the transition of the iPad from a media tablet to a productivity tool for businesses, and sell millions of Office apps.

But, it could also cut into sales of the more expensive Office software for PCs and Macs, and give up a potential advantage for tablets based on Microsoft's mobile version of Windows. (Office is already available on smartphones running Windows Phone Series 7 and its predecessor, Windows Mobile.)

Maybe that's why the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant appears to be dragging its feet when it comes to offering an Office app for the iPad.

Persistent Reports

At the moment, Microsoft is denying a report in The Daily, News Corp.'s periodical for the iPad, that Office for Apple's iOS platform exists in the testing stage and will be available within weeks.

The Daily's Peter Ha said he had used a demonstration version of the new software, courtesy of a Microsoft employee, and said it would soon be submitted to Apple for approval. Ha said the demo was similar to the OneNote app that is already available free from Microsoft via the App Store (with paid features available). OneNote allows limited creation of Office documents.

Ha said demo version he used had "hints" of a new design user interface called Metro that is already used in Windows Phone 7 products and will be a part of Windows 8.

The report follows one in November in which The Daily said Office for iPad was in the works. An analyst told us then that it would likely take some time for Microsoft to pare down a complex system for a lower-performance, smaller capacity system like a tablet.

Microsoft quickly denied the latest report, telling The New York Times it was based on "inaccurate rumors and speculation," and that an image supposedly of a Windows icon was "not our software," declining to comment further.

On Wednesday, Microsoft Tweeted: "Great respect for The Daily but regrettably someone is giving them bad info, and that'll be clear in the coming weeks." That was a reference to The Daily's assertion that Office for iPad would be available in such a time frame.

In response to our own inquiry directed to Microsoft today, an unattributed Microsoft spokesperson replied simply, "We have nothing to share at this time."

'No Fake Images'

Ha on Wednesday stuck to his guns, saying, "We did not fabricate the story, nor did we fake images in any way," insisting that Microsoft employees are behind the leak. He said it was likely that more than one version was being tested, which suggests it could be awhile before Office appears in the iTunes App Store. (continued...)

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