ISRO (Indian Space Research Organisation) Statistics 2024 By Country, Type Of Institution, Intellectual Property Rights, Government Expenditure And List Of Satellites Launched

Ketaki Joshi
Written by
Ketaki Joshi

Updated · May 28, 2024

Aruna Madrekar
Edited by
Aruna Madrekar

Editor

ISRO (Indian Space Research Organisation) Statistics 2024 By Country, Type Of Institution, Intellectual Property Rights, Government Expenditure And List Of Satellites Launched

Introduction

ISRO Statistics: In recent years, ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization) has achieved some remarkable space missions. The agency was founded in 1969 by Dr. Vikram Sarabhai which received its recognition worldwide in recent years. ISRO is capable of recoverable payloads, manufacturing satellites, and operating them.

As stated in these ISRO Statistics, sites to observe the earth, satellites, etc, are spread all across India. With a more than 90% success rate for space missions, the Indian Space Research Organization has more to offer on the plate. The following insights reveal the overall performance of the space agency since its incorporation.

Editor’s Choice

  • In the fiscal year 2023-2024, the Department of Space (DoS) received a budget allocation of ₹12,543.91 crore. This includes funding for ISRO, New Space India Limited (NSIL), and the Indian National Space Promotion and Authorisation Centre (IN-SPACe).
  • India’s space economy is valued at approximately $8.4 billion, representing 2%-3% of the global space economy. It is projected to grow to $44 billion by 2033, driven by private sector contributions and the Indian Space Policy (ISP).
  • ISRO generated $15 million in revenue from satellite launches between 2003 and 2013. This increased to $157 million between 2014 and 2023, with 396 foreign satellites and 70 domestic satellites launched during this period.
  • The Indian space sector is projected to grow at a rate of 6%-8% annually, with significant emphasis on private sector involvement and innovation.
  • The satellite services segment is estimated to account for 36% of India’s space economy by 2025. Other segments include the ground segment (31%), satellite manufacturing (25%), and launch services (8.15%).
  • ISRO has conducted 125 spacecraft missions and 92 launch missions, with notable achievements like the Chandrayaan missions, the Mars Orbiter Mission (Mangalyaan), and the Aditya-L1 mission for solar observations.
  • ISRO is responsible for atmospheric sciences and space sciences under the support of the Department of Space.
  • To provide real-time timing and positioning information across India and nearby regions, ISRO developed a navigation system named NAVIC.
  • Bhuvan, developed by ISRO, is a geoportal providing services and data related to satellite remote sensing for public reference.
  • In 2023, ISRO successfully launched Aditya-L1 carrying seven payloads for studying the Sun.
  • In 2017, India set a world record by launching 104 satellites in a single mission.
  • ISRO was originally named INCOSPAR (Indian National Committee for Space Research) in 1962.
  • ISRO is the fourth space agency to successfully launch a spacecraft to orbit Mars.
  • In 1980, India became the sixth country to launch a satellite named Rohini using the indigenous Satellite Launch Vehicle (SLV-3).
  • On April 19, 1975, India’s first satellite, Aryabhata, was launched by a Soviet Kosmos-3M rocket from Kapustin Yar.
  • By the end of 2023, 33 universities and colleges, along with 24 IITs, NITs, and research institutions, collaborated with ISRO.

Key Missions and Projects for 2024

  • Gaganyaan Mission: Scheduled for key tests and demonstrations throughout 2024, aiming for India’s first crewed space mission.
  • NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR): A collaborative mission with NASA scheduled for launch in 2024.
  • INSAT-3DS: A communication satellite for meteorology and disaster management studies.
  • RISAT-1B and Resourcesat-3: Enhancing remote sensing capabilities.
  • TDS01 and SPADEX: Technological research and experiments for Moon missions.

Facts About ISRO

  • Previously, ISRO was named INCOSPAR (Indian National Committee for Space Research), which was given by the Government of India IN 1962.
  • ISRO, formed in 1969, replaced INCOSPAR; as DOS was set up, ISRO was termed under DOS in 1972.
  • ISRO Statistics show that this Indian space agency is responsible for atmospheric sciences and space sciences for general function under the support of the Department of Space.
  • In addition, it has various devoted research centers as well as autonomous institutions for astronomy and remote sensing within the same department. 
  • On April 19, 1975, India’s first satellite, named ‘Aryabhata’ was launched by a Soviet Kosmos-3M rocket from Kapustin Yar. Moreover, Aryabhata was designed and manufactured in India. 
  • Furthermore, ISRO is the fourth space agency to launch a spacecraft successfully in space to orbit Mars.
  • Bhuvan, developed by ISRO, is an Indian Space Research Organization’s geoportal, which provides services and data related to satellite remote sensing for public reference.
  • ISRO supports women’s empowerment, and thus, many female engineers and scientists play crucial roles in ISRO’s space missions.
  • ISRO is developing an (RLV) reusable launch vehicle to reduce the cost of launching satellites.

By Milestones Achieved Over The Years By ISRO

  • In 1980, India became the sixth country in the world to launch a satellite named Rohini by “Make in India” launch vehicle, Satellite Launch Vehicle (SLV-3).
  • PSLV is one of the most adaptable and reliable launch vehicles in the world developed by ISRO.
  • ISRO-developed GSLV (Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle) is also the most powerful launch vehicle. It has placed satellites into geostationary orbits.
  • ISRO Statistics by satellite launches report that, In 2017, India set a World Record by launching 104 satellites altogether. 
  • To provide real-time timing and positioning information across India and nearby regions, ISRO developed a navigation system named NAVIC, containing even satellites.
  • India marked its name in history with a soft landing on the Moon’s south pole in 2023.
  • In 2023, ISRO successfully launched Aditya-L1 carrying seven payloads for the purpose of Sun study.

The Following Charts Explain The Missions Of ISRO

Solar Missions Start Date End Date Details of the mission
Aditya- L1 2 September, 2023 TBD To study solar corona through solar coronagraph, as well as chromosphere using near UV instrument. 

 

Lunar (Chandrayaan Programme) Start Date End Date Details of the mission
Chandrayaan 1  22 October 2008 28 August 2009 For lunar probe
Chandrayaan 2 22nd July 2019 Crashed on the moon’s surface because of loss of control Map the location and abundance of water on the lunar
Chandrayaan 3 14 July 2023 10 November 2023 To demonstrate a completely safe landing on the moon and roving on the surface

 

Interplanetary Start Date End Date Details of the mission
Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) 5 November 2013 2 October 2022 To orbit Mars 

 

Astronomy Start Date End Date Details of the mission
ASTROSAT 28 September 2015 September 2022 To observe multi-wave lengths of celestial bodies, as well as cosmic sources, in UV spectral and X-ray bands concurrently. 
X-Ray Polarimete Stellite 1 January 2024 TBD To study the polarization of cosmic X-rays

 

Planned Missions Expected Launch Spacecraft Details of the mission
NISAR, NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) May, 2024 SAR Satellite Co-mission to launch a dual frequency synthetic aperture radar satellite for remote sensing
SPADEX Q3 2024 (TBD) Space Docking Experiment To support space technologies related to formation flying, docking, orbital rendezvous, including applications in human spaceflight, etc
Gaganyaan 1  Late 2024 Test flight (not crewed) Indian crewed orbital spacecraft (Co-joined by ISRO and HAL).
Gaganyan 2  Mid-2025 Test flight (not crewed)
Venus Orbiter Mission (Shukrayaan) TBD Venus Orbiter To study the Venus’s atmosphere
Mars Orbiter Mission 2 TBD Mars Orbiter To orbit Mars
Gaganyaan 3  2025 Crewed Spacecraft To send humans to space independently
Lunar Polar Exploration Mission 2026 Lunar Lander, rover To explore the south pole of the Moon (not formally proposed)
Chandrayaan 4 2028 (TBD) Lunar lander, sample return to earth
Bharatiya Antariksha Station 2028 to 2035 Space Station Orbiting around 400 kilometers above the earth, weighing 20 tonnes.
AstroSat-2 TBD Space Telescope Multi-wavelength space telescope

(Source: wikipedia.org)

By Satellites Launched From India By Country

Based on ISRO Statistics, as of July 2023, India launched a total of 431 satellites, *indicating the support of international collaboration.

Country Name Total number of Satellites
United States 231
United Kingdom 86
Singapore 20
Germany 13*
Canada 12
Republic of Korea 6
Israel 5*
Italy 5
Japan 5
Luxembourg 5
Algeria 4
France 4
Lithuania 4
Switzerland 4*
Netherlands 3*
Austria 3
Finland 3
Indonesia 3
Belgium 2*
Denmark 2
Spain 2
Argentina 1
Australia 1
Brazil 1
Chile 1
Colombia 1
Czech Republic 1
China 1
Kazakhstan 1
Latvia 1
Malaysia 1
Mexico 1*
Norway 1
Slovakia 1
Turkey 1
United Arab Emirates 1

(Source: wikipedia.org)

Number Of R&D Partner Collaborations With ISRO

Number Of Research And Development Partner Collaborations With ISRO In Financial Year 2023, By Type Of Institution(Reference: statista.com)

According to ISRO Statistics 2023, 33 universities and colleges collaborated with ISRO at the end of 2023. In addition, 24 IITs, NITs, and Research institutions and laboratories collectively operated with the Indian Space Research Organization.

Government Expenditure On Space Sector In India

Government Expenditure On Space Sector In India From Financial Year 2017 To 2024(Reference: statista.com)

According to ISRO Statistics, government expenditures on the space sector were lowest in 2017, at 965.2 million (value rate of May 2024). However, with some major increases and decreases, the amount reached 1.506 billion in FY 2024.

Intellectual Property Rights Owned By ISRO

Intellectual Property Rights Owned By Indian Space Research Organization As Of Financial Year 2023, By Type

(Reference: statista.com)

ISRO Factsheet reports that, as of 2023, 223 active patents were owned by the Indian Space Research Organization, while 73 were active copyrights. In addition, 13 were reported to be active trademarks. Statista analysis shows that the number of registered patents has shown an increase with year on year rate.

ISRO Statistics By Overall Success Rate

ISRO Statistics by Overall Success Rate(Source: isrostats.in)

ISRO Statistics show that, as of today, with a total of 87 missions, the overall success rate recorded is 91%, while 9.4% is a failure rate for 9 launches in history.

ISRO Space Missions FY 2024

Characteristic Number of Estimated Space Missions
Earth observation satellite 2
Communication satellite 1
Navigation satellite 1
Space science satellite 3
Technology demonstrator 0
PSLV 4
GSLV MK II 2
GSLV MK III 1
Small satellite launch vehicle 1
Gaganyaan (Unmanned) 0

(Source: statista.com)

According to ISRO Statistics 2024, ISRO has planned 15 space missions, 2 of which are earth observation satellite launches. The most commonly used launch vehicle is the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV).

PSLV Launches By ISRO (Between 1993 To 2024)

Name Launch Date
PSLV-D1 September 20, 1993
PSLV-D2 October 15, 1994
PSLV-D3 / IRS- P3 March 21, 1996
PSLV-C1 / IRS 1D September 29, 1997
PSLV – C2 / IRS-P4 May 26, 1999
PSLV-C3 / TES October 22, 2001
PSLV-C4 / Kalpana-1 September 12, 2002
PSLV – C5 / RESOURCESAT- 1 October 17, 2003
PSLV- C6/ CARTOSAT- 1/ HAMSAT May 05, 2005
PSLV-C7 / CARTOSAT-2 / SRE-1 Jan 10, 2007
PSLV-C8 April 23, 2007
PSLV-C10 January 21, 2008
PSLV-C9 / CARTOSAT -2A April 28, 2008
PSLV-C11 October 22, 2008
PSLV-C12 / RISAT-2 April 20, 2009
PSLV-C14 / OCEANSAT- 2 September 23, 2009
PSLV – C15 / CARTOSAT -2B July 12, 2010
PSLV – C16/ RESOURCESAT -2 April 20, 2011
PSLV – C17 / GSAT – 12 July 15, 2011
PSLV- C18/ Megha Tropiques October 12, 2011
PSLV – C19/ RISAT- 1 April 26, 2012
PSLV – c21 September 09, 2012
PSLV, C20 / SARAL February 25, 2012
PSLV, C22 / IRNSS -1A July 01, 2013
PSLV – C25 November 05, 2013
PSLV – C24 / IRNSS – 1B April 04, 2014
PSLV, C23 June 30, 2014
PSLV, C26/ IRNSS-1C October 16, 2014
PSLV – C27, IRNSS – 1D March 28, 2015
PSLV – C28 / DMC3 Mission July 10, 2015
PSLV – C30/ AstroSat Mission September 28, 2015
PSLV – C29 / TeLEOS- 1 Mission December 16, 2015
PSLV – C31 / IRNSS-1E January 20, 2016
PSLV – C32/ IRNSS- 1F March 10, 2016
PSLV – C33/IRNSS – 1G April 28, 2016
PSLV – C34/ CARTOSAT- 2 Series Satellite June 22, 2016
PSLV – C35 / SCATSAT-1 September 26, 2016
PSLV- C36/ Cartosat – 2 Series Satellite February 15, 2017
PSLV – C38 / Cartosat- 2 Series Satellite June 23, 2017
PSLV -C39 / IRNSS – 1H Mission August 31, 2017
PSLV – C40 / Cartosat 2 Series Satellite Mission January 12, 2018
PSLV – C41 / IRNSS – 1I April 12, 2018
PSLV – C42 Mission September 16, 2018
PSLV – C43 / HysIS Mission November 29, 2018
PSLV – C44 January 24, 2019
PSLV -C45 / EMISAT Mission April -1, 2019
PSLV – C46 Mission May 22, 2019
PSLV- C47 / Cartosat- 3 Mission November 27, 2019
PSLV – C46 / RISAT- 2BR1 December 11, 2019
PSLV – C49/ EOS-01 November 07, 2020
PSLV – C50/ CMS-01 December 17, 2020
PSLV – C51/ Amazonia 1  February 28, 2021
PSLV – C52/ EOS- 04 Mission February 14, 2022
PSLV – C53/ EOS-04 Mission June 30, 2022
PSLV – C54 / EOS-06 Mission November 26, 2022
PSLV – C55/ TeLEOS-2 Mission April 22, 2023
PSLV -C56/ DS SAR Mission July 30, 2023
PSLV – C57, Aditya L1 Mission September 02, 2023
PSLV – C58/ XPoSat Mission  January 01, 2024

(Source: isro.gov.in)

GSLV Launches By ISRO (Between 2001 To 2024)

Name  Launch Date
GSLV – D1/ GSAT-1 April 18, 2001
GSLV – D2/ GSAT- 2 May 08, 2003
GSLV – F01 / EDUSAT (GSAT-3) September 20, 2004
GSLV – F02/ INSAT- 4C July 10, 2006
GSLV – F04 / INSAT -4CR September 02, 2007
GSLV – D3 / GSAT-4 April 15, 2010
GSLV – D5/ GSAT-14 January 05, 2014
GSLV – D6 August 27, 2015
GSLV – F05/ INSAT -3DR September 08, 2016
GSLV – F09 / GSAT-9 May 05, 2017
GSLV – F08/ GSAT 6A Mission March 29, 2018
GSLV – F11/ GSAT- 7A Mission December 19,2018
GSLV – F10 / E0S-03 August 12, 2021
GSLV – F12 / NVS-01 Mission May 29, 2023
GSLV – F14/ INSAT- 3DS Mission February 17, 2024

(Source: isro.gov.in)

List Of Satellites Launched (Between 1975 To 2024)

Satellite Name Launch date
Aryabhata April 19, 1975
Bhaskara-I June 07, 1979
Rohini Technology Payload (RTP) August 10, 1979
Rohini Satellite RS-1 July 18, 1980
Rohini Satellite RS-D1 May 31, 1981
APPLE June 19, 1981
Bhaskara-II November 20, 1981
INSAT-1A April 10, 1982
Rohini Satellite RS-D2 April 17, 1983
INSAT-1B August 30, 1983
SROSS- 1 March 24, 1987
IRS-1A March 17, 1988
SROSS-2 July 13, 1988
INSAT-1C July 22, 1988
INSAT-1D June 12, 1990
IRS-1B August 29, 1991
SROSS-C May 20, 1992
INSAT-2A July 10, 1992
INSAT0 2B July 23, 1993
IRS-1E September 20, 1993
SROSS-C2 May 04, 1994
IRS-P2 October 15, 1994
INSAT-2C December 07, 1995
IRS-1C December 28, 1995
IRS – P3 March 21, 1996
INSAT-2D June 04, 1997
IRS-1D September 29, 1997
INSAT-2E April 03, 1999
Oceansat (IRS-P4) May 26, 1999
INSAT-3B March 22, 2000
GSAT-1 April 18, 2001
The Technology Experiment Satellite (TES) October 22, 2001
INSAT-3C January 24, 2002
KALPANA-1 September 12, 2002
INSAT-3A April 10, 2003
GSAT-2 May 08, 2003
INSAT-3E September 28, 2003
IRS- 06/ RESOURCESAT-1 October 17, 2003
EDUSAT September 20, 2024 
HAMSAT May 05, 2005
CARTOSAT-1 May 05, 2005
INSAT-4A December 22, 2005
INSAT-4C July 10, 2006
SRE-1  January 10, 2007
CARTOSAT-2 January 10, 2007
INSAT – 4B March 12, 2007
INSAT-4CR September 02, 2007
CARTOSAT-2A April 28, 2008
IMS-1 April 28, 2008
Chandyaraan – 1 October 22, 2008
RISA- 2  April 20, 2009
Oceansat- 2 September 23, 2009
GSAT-4 April 15, 2010
CARTOSAT-2B July 12, 2010
GSAT-5P December 25, 2010
YOUTHSAT April 20, 2011
RESOURCESAT-2 April 20, 2011
GSAT- 8  May 21, 2011
GSAT-12 July 15, 2011
Megha- Tropiques October 12, 2011
RISAT-1  April 26, 2012
GSAT-10 September 29, 2012
SARAL February 25, 2013
IRNSS-1A July 01, 2013
INSAT-3D July 26, 2013
GSAT-7 August 30, 2013
Mars orbiter Mission Spacecraft November 05, 2013
GSAT-14 January 05, 2014
IRNSS-1B April – 04, 2014
IRNSS-1C October 16, 2014
GSAT- 16 December 07, 2014
Crew Module Atmospheric Re-Entry Experiment (CARE) December 18, 2014
ISNSS-1D March 28, 2015
GSAT-6 August 27, 2015
Astrosat September 28, 2015
GSAT-15 November 11, 2015
IRNSS-1E January 20, 2016
IRNSS-1F March 10, 2016
IRNSS-1G April 28, 2016
CARTOSAT – 2 Series Satellite June 22, 2016
INSAT-3DR September 08, 2016
SCATSAT-1  September 26, 2016
GSAT-18 October 06, 2016
RESOURCESAT- 2A December 07, 2016
INS-1B February 15, 2017
INS-1A February 15, 2017
Cartosat- 2 Series Satellite February 15, 2017
GSAT-9 May 05, 2017
GSAT-19 June 05, 2017
Cartosat- 2 Series Satellite June 23, 2017
GSAT-17 June 29, 2017
IRNSS-1H August 31, 2017
Cartosat- 2 Series Satellite January 12, 2018
Microsat January 12, 2018
INS-1C January 12, 2018
GSAT – 6A March 29, 2018
IRNSS- 1I April 12, 2018
GSAT-29 November 14, 2018
HysIS November 29, 2018
GSAT-11 Mission December 05, 2018
GSAT-7A December 19, 2018
Microsat-R January 24, 2019
GSAT-31 February 06, 2019
EMISAT April 01, 2019
RISAT-2B May 22, 2019
Chandrayaan 2 July 22, 2019
Cartosat-3 November 27, 2019
RISAT-2BR1 December 11, 2019
GSAT-30 January 17, 2020
EOS-01 November 07, 2020
CMS- 01 December 17, 2020
EOS- 03 August 12, 2021
EOS- 04 February 14, 2022
INS- 2TD February 14, 2022
GSAT – 24 June 23, 2022
EOS-02 August 07, 2022
EOS-06 November 26, 2022
INS- 2B November 26, 2022
EOS-07 February 10, 2023
NVS – 01 May 29, 2023
Chandrayaan – 3  July 14, 2023
Aditya L1 September 02, 2023
XPoSat January 2021, 2024
INSAT -3 DS February 17, 2024

(Source: isro.gov.in)

By Launches From SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota, India

Launch Mission Name Launch Date
SLV- 3E1 August 10, 1979
SLV- 3E2 July 18, 1980
SLV- 3D1 May 31, 1981
SLV- 3  April 17, 1983
ASLV – D1 March 24, 1987
ASLV – D2 July 13, 1988
ASLV, D3 May 20, 1992
PSLV, D1 September 20, 1993
ASLV, D4 May 05, 1994
PSLV- D2 October 15, 1994
PSLV- D3 / IRS- P3 March 21, 1996
PSLV-C1 / IRS-1D September 29, 1997
PSLV – C2 / IRS-P4 May 26, 1999
GSLV – D1 / GSAT-1 April 18, 2001
PSLV -C3 / TES October 22, 2001
PSLV- C4 / KALPANA -1 September 12, 2002
GSLV- D2/ GSAT -2  May 08, 2003
PSLV -C5 / RESOURCESAT- 1 October 17, 2003
GSLV- F01/ EDUSAT (GSAT-3) September 20, 2004
PSLV – C6/ CARTOSAT- 1/ HAMSAT May 05, 2005
GSLV- F02 / INSAT – 4C July 10, 2006
PSLV-C7 / CARTOSAT- 2/ SRE- 1 January 10, 2007
PSLV – C8 April 23, 2007
GSLV-F04 / INSAT- 4CR September 02, 2007
PSLV – C10 January 21, 2008
PSLV-C9 / CARTOSAT- 2A April 28, 2008
PSLV – C11 October 22, 2008
PSLV- C12 / RISAT- 2 April 20, 2009
PSLV- C14/ OCEANSAT- 2 September 23, 2009
GSLV -D3 / GSAT -4 April 15, 2010
PSLV – C15/ CARTOSAT- 2B July 12, 2010
GSLV, F06 / GSAT – 5P December 25, 2010
PSLV – C16/ RESOURCESAT -2 April 20, 2011
PSLV -C17 / GSAT-12 July 15, 2011
P -C18 / Megha Tropiques October 12, 2011
PSLV- C19 / RISAT -1 April 26, 2-12
PSLV -C21 September 09, 2012
PSLV – C20/ SARAL February 25, 2012
PSLV-C22 / IRNSS- 1A July 01, 2013
PSLV – C25 November 05, 2013
GSLV – D5/ GSAT- 14 January 05, 2014
PSLV, C24/ IRNSS – 1B April 04, 2014
PSLV – C23 June 30, 2014
PSLV – C26/ IRNSS- 1C October 16, 2014
LVM – 3/ CARE Mission December 18, 2014
PSLV – C27. IRNSS – 1D March 28, 2015
PSLV- C28 / DMC3 Mission July 10, 2015
GSLV – D6 August 27, 2015
PSLV- C30 / AstroSat Mission September 28, 2015
PSLV – C29 / TeLEOS- 1 Mission December 16, 2015
PSLV – C31 / IRNSS -1E January 20, 2016
PSLV – C32 / IRNSS -1F March 10, 2016
PSLV – C33 / IRNSS- 1G April 28, 2016
RLV-TD May 23, 2016
PSLV, C 34 / CARTOSAT – 2 Series Satellite June 22, 2016
Scramjet Engine – TD August 28, 2016
GSLV, F05 / INSAT – 3DR September 08, 2016
PSLV – C35 / SCATSAT- 1 September 26, 2016
PSLV- C36 / RESOURCESAT- 2A December 07, 2016
PSLV- C37 / Cartosat 2 Series Satellite February 15, 2017
GSLV- F09 / GSAT- 9 May 05, 2017
GSLV Mk III – D1/ GSAT- 19 mission June 05, 2017
PSLV – C38 / Cartosat – 2 Series Satellite June 23, 2017
PSLV- C40 / Cartonsat -2 Series Satellite Mission January 2012, 2018
GSLV – F08/ GSAT – 6A Mission March 29, 2018
PSLV – C41/ IRNSS- 1I April 12, 2018
CREW ESCAPE SYSTEM  July 05, 2018
PSLV, C42 Mission September 16, 2018
GSLV Mk III – D2 / GSAT- 29 Mission November 14, 2018
PSLV- C43 / HysIS Mission November 29, 2018
GSLV- F11/ GSAT-7A Mission December 19, 2018
PSLV – C44 January 24, 2019
PSLV – C45/ EMISAT Mission April 01, 2019
PSLV – C46 Mission May 22, 2019
GSLV – Mk III -M1 / Chandrayaan – 2 Mission July 22, 2019
PSLV – C47 / Cartosat -3 Mission November 27, 2019
PSLV – C48, RISAT – 2BR1 December 11, 2019
PSLV – C49 /EOS – 01 November 07, 2020
PSLV- C50, CMS – 01 December 17, 2020
PSLV – C51 / Amazona – 1 February 28, 2021
GSLV – F10 / EOS – 03 August 12, 2021
PSLV – C52 / EOS – 04 Mission February 14, 2022
PSLV- C53 / DS EO Mission June 30, 2022
SSLV – D1 / EOS – D2 Mission August 7, 2022
LVM3 M2/ One Web India – 1 Mission October 23, 2022
PSLV – C54 / EOS -06 Mission November 26, 2022
SSLV – D2 / EOS – 07 Mission February 10, 2023
LVM3 M3/ OneWb India – 2 Mission March 26, 2023
PSLV- C55 / TeLEOS- 2 Mission April 22, 2023
GSLV- F12/ NVS- 01 Mission May 29, 2023
LVM3 M4/ Chandrayaan 3 Mission July 14, 2023
PSLV – C56/ DS-SAR Mission July 30, 2023
PSLV – C57/ Aditya – L1 Mission September 02, 2023
GSLV, F14/ INSAT- 3DDS Mission February 17, 2024
PSLV- C58/ XPoSat Mission January 01, 2024

(Source: isro.gov.in)

By Organization Structure And Facilities Location

Research Facilities

Name Location Description
Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre Thiruvananthapuram Technical center, site for the development of SLV-3, ASLV, PSLV series, and GSLV as well.
Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre Thiruvananthapuram and Bengaluru Design, development, testing, and implementation of liquid propulsion control packages, liquid engines, and liquid stages for launch satellites and vehicles. Bengaluru site produces precision transducers.
Physical Research Laboratory Ahmedabad Operations of the observatory at Udaipur. The study site for archaeology, astrophysics, plasma physics, hydrology, gro-cosmo physics, infrared astronomy, and solar planetary physics.
Space Applications Centre Ahmedabad Site for practical use of Space technology, research conducted at SAC for surveying, remote sensing, meteorology, environment monitoring, geodesy and satellite-based telecommunications
National Atmospheric Research Laboratory Tirupati Site for conducting fundamental and applied research in atmospheric and space sciences 
North-Eastern Space Applications Centre Shillong Provides developmental support to the Northeast for application projects such as GIS, remote sensing, satellite communication, and space science research.

Test Facilities

Name Location Description
ISRO Propulsion Complex Mahendragiri Site for testing & assembly of liquid propulsion control packages, liquid engines, and stages for launch satellites and vehicles.

Construction And Launch Facilities

Name Location Description
U R Rao Satellite Centre Bengaluru A manufacturing site for spacecraft
Laboratory for Electro-Optics Systems Bengaluru Site for development of altitude sensors for satellites
Satish Dhawan Space Centre Sriharikota Launch Site
Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station, Thiruvananthapuram Launch site for sounding rockets

Tracking And Control Facilities

Name Location Description
Space Situational Awareness Control Centre Peenya, Bengaluru Site for monitoring space debris and safeguarding space assets.
ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network Bengaluru (ground stations spread throughout India) Tracking telemetry, ground operations, and software development
Master Control Facility Bhopal, Hassan Site for geostationary satellite orbit raising, in-orbit operations, and payload testing
Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) Bengaluru Real-time receives, processes, distributes, and archives spacecraft health data as well as payload data
National Remote Sensing Centre Hyderabad Site for studying aerial surveying and application of remote sensing to handle natural resources

(Source: wikipedia.org)

A History Of ISRO And India’s Space Journey

The story of India’s space program is one of vision, self-reliance, and remarkable progress. It all began in the early 1960s when the potential of space applications was still blossoming. Dr. Vikram Sarabhai, a far-sighted scientist, recognized the immense benefits space technology could bring to India. He envisioned using satellites to address critical national needs in communication, resource management, and disaster warning.

Setting The Stage: The Seeds Of ISRO (1962-1969)

In 1962, with Dr. Sarabhai at the helm, the Indian National Committee for Space Research (INCOSPAR) was established. INCOSPAR acted as the initial framework for India’s space endeavours. It focused on research and development in space science and applications, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive space program.

ISRO Takes Flight (1969 Onwards)

By 1969, India’s space ambitions had taken a giant leap forward. INCOSPAR was superseded by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). This marked a significant shift, with ISRO taking on a more prominent role with an expanded mandate. It aimed not just at research but also at developing and utilising space technology for India’s socio-economic development.

The 1970s And 1980s: Building The Foundation

The 1970s and 1980s were crucial decades for ISRO. The organisation made significant strides in several key areas:

  • Satellite Launching: The Soviet Union launched India’s first satellite, Aryabhata, in 1975. This marked a historic moment and ignited the nation’s space aspirations. However, relying on foreign launches wasn’t ideal. ISRO’s focus shifted towards developing indigenous launch vehicles. The Satellite Launch Vehicle (SLV-3) successfully placed India’s Rohini satellite in orbit in 1980, making India the sixth nation to achieve this feat.
  • Communication and Remote Sensing: Recognizing the importance of communication satellites, ISRO launched the Indian National Satellite (INSAT) system in 1988. INSAT revolutionised telecommunication, television broadcasting, and weather forecasting across India. Additionally, the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) program provided valuable data for resource management, agriculture, and disaster mitigation.

The 1990s And 2000s: Expanding Horizons

The following decades saw ISRO’s capabilities soar:

  • Self-Reliance: Self-reliance has been a cornerstone of India’s space strategy. ISRO developed a series of more powerful launch vehicles, such as the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) and the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV). This not only reduced dependence on foreign launches but also made India a cost-effective launch service provider for other countries.
  • Space Exploration: India’s space ambitions extended beyond Earth’s orbit. Chandrayaan-1, launched in 2008, became the first Asian probe to discover water on the lunar surface. This mission marked a significant achievement in planetary exploration. Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), in 2014, achieved success on a shoestring budget (around $73 million), making India the first country in the world to reach Mars on its maiden attempt.

What Propelled India’s Space Journey?

Several key strategies have contributed to India’s remarkable progress in space:

  • Focus on Self-Reliance: By developing its own technologies and launch vehicles, ISRO has achieved significant cost savings and greater control over its space program.
  • Prioritisation of National Needs: ISRO’s programs are driven by addressing critical national requirements in communication, resource management, and disaster preparedness. Space applications directly benefit the lives of millions of Indians.
  • Efficient Use of Resources: ISRO has consistently delivered successful missions at a fraction of the cost compared to many space agencies. This focus on frugality has allowed India to do more with less.
  • Investment in Human Capital: ISRO has nurtured a strong pool of scientists and engineers, creating a robust talent base for its endeavors.

India’s Space Dreams Take Flight

India’s space program continues to break new ground. Here’s a glimpse into the future:

  • Gaganyaan Mission: ISRO aims to send a human mission to space by 2024. This ambitious project will be a crowning achievement for India’s spacefaring ambitions.
  • Reusable Launch Vehicles: ISRO is developing reusable launch vehicles to reduce launch costs further and enhance mission capabilities.
  • Deep Space Exploration: India’s vision extends beyond near-Earth space. Missions to Venus and the outer solar system are planned, demonstrating India’s commitment to deeper space exploration.
  • International Collaboration: While self-reliance remains a core principle, ISRO is increasingly collaborating with other space agencies. This fosters knowledge sharing and opens doors for participation in larger international space endeavors.

Conclusion

From its humble beginnings, ISRO has come a long way. Today, India is a major player in the global space arena. Its focus on self-reliance, addressing national needs, and efficient resource utilization has been instrumental in its success. With ambitious future missions and a growing emphasis on international collaboration, India’s space journey is poised for even greater achievements in the years to come.

This incredible story of India’s space program is a testament to the power of vision, dedication, and strategic planning. It inspires other developing nations seeking to harness the potential of space technology for their own advancement. Thus, as proven by these recent ISRO Statistics, the Indian Space Agency holds a bright future.

FAQ.

What is the full form of ISRO?

ISRO stands for Indian Space Research Organization.

When was ISRO formed?

ISRO was formed on August 15, 1969.

Who is the founding father of the Indian Space Programme?

Dr. Vikram A Sarabhai is the founding father of Indian Space programs. 

Ketaki Joshi
Ketaki Joshi

Ketaki Joshi is a professional medical writer with extensive experience in scientific research on illness, health, and healthcare. Her work includes creating feature articles for newsletters and websites, as well as research news stories for doctors and researchers. With a lifelong passion for reading, Ketaki transitioned from a career at a French multinational company to pursue writing professionally. Her dedication to the craft has culminated in the recent release of her first Amazon-published short story, "The Envelope That Changed Our Lives."

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